Wednesday, March 02, 2005

Being Interviewed

Last week, a former student interviewed me for a paper she was writing for her Intro to Education class. I was flattered and then flummoxed. At my age, I have had a good many years of teaching behind me--something I knew but didn't really appreciate until the interview. Two of her questions stood out the most: why did I become a teacher, and was there ever a time when I'd regretted the choices that I'd made?

I think that I was meant to teach. Coming from the "teach anything but middle school" Goins family, I admired teachers and always felt comfortable teaching. The only choice that I regret was in not getting my degrees sooner so that I could be working on a doctorate now (or finishing one).

By the time I was thirty, I realized that I'd be happiest teaching at a community college, and by the time I was forty, I was there. And I'm happy. My professional life has balance, which gives me time to crane my neck and look outward at higher education across the country and to develop a far wider perspective than I've had regarding politics, publication, funding and so forth.

What about the rest of you, readers? Why did you become teachers?

4 Comments:

At 5:31 AM, Anonymous Sigma said...

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At 4:19 AM, Blogger TomKorn said...

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At 4:01 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

A sense of confidence and responsibility not only helps ease the transition from high school to college, but it's also vital for success in later life. Self-confidence can help your teenager approach professors with questions or problems and will make socializing with other students much easier. writing custom

 
At 2:36 AM, Blogger Katherine Hayden said...

Many students don't know how to write a good research paper.I admired teachers and always felt comfortable teaching. As i am working for the online service , we used to help the students in their learning and writing.

 

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